From the article:

“It’s tempting to downplay 835 deaths compared to 4.4 million residents, but the fact is 2016 was among the deadliest years for traffic deaths in the state and nation.  Even more startling, nearly 4,000 people have died on Kentucky roads since 2012. Unless we make changes, those numbers will climb.”

none

From the article:

“Scott, who also oversees city employees’ safety, said that at least once a day, he hears complaints from work crews that vehicles traveling near them were speeding or doing something else dangerous – despite signs posted to alert them to the crews’ presence.

“Anytime you see an orange (highway warning) sign, you need to put down your phone and pay attention” to your surroundings, said Lisa Price Hughes, resident administrator at VDOT’s office in Bassett Forks.

Hughes said she also hears complaints from crews daily. For instance, she said, crews tell her that when they are in a traffic lane and/or flagging vehicles, some vehicles will change lanes at the last moment, despite warning signs being placed at least a quarter of a mile in either direction.”

none

From the article:

Straessle said, “Most accidents don’t occur in the work zone, itself, they occur prior to the work zone.”

Highway Police said this spot is called the “QUE.” It’s an area where traffic drastically slows down and a place that’s prone to accidents.

Cpl. Jason Daggs with the Arkansas Highway Police says, when a “QUE” is identified, officers will drive a quarter of a mile from the QUE itself with their emergency lights on, facing the opposite way of traffic.

none

From the article:

“On Wednesday AccessMap – a University of Washington project spearheaded by the Taskar Center for Accessible Technology — launched a new online travel planner offering customizable suggestions for people who need accessible or pedestrian-friendly routes when getting from point A to B in Seattle.

It will also route people around Seattle’s ubiquitous building and construction sites that can close sidewalks for entire blocks, forcing people who are traveling on foot or using assistive devices to embark on unforeseen detours. The research team will present the project Feb. 1 at the Global City Teams Challenge summit in Portland, Oregon.”

none

From the article:

“South Carolina’s highways rank as the nation’s deadliest, according to the National Transportation Safety Board’s latest report, using 2014 data.”

 

 

none

From the article:

“I would say between 50-75 percent of those calls we have issues where people either move the wrong way or don’t move at all,” said Lee Avery, EMS specialist with Greenville Fire/Rescue.

none

From the article:

“Ninety percent of crashes are a result of human error,” Bhatt said. “That’s why we don’t call them accidents, we call them crashes.”

none

From the article:

“Council staff who operate the Stop/Slow signs at the site will often wave the sign up and down in their attempts to get approaching vehicles to ease on their brakes, Mr Ryan said.”

none

From the article:

“It’s estimated that more than 100 emergency workers are killed by distracted drivers each year while working at roadway accidents. Here in New York, the “Move Over” law has been on the books for several years to help reduce incidents of emergency workers being hit by passing traffic.”

none

From the article:

“The impact was so great that the cab disconnected from the truck. It was mangled, it was in the middle of the road.”

none

Categories

Most commented

  • None found